The Mutiny On Board H.M.S. Bounty PDF Free Download

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by William Bligh

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In 1787, William Bligh, commander of the Bounty, sailed under Captain Cook on a voyage to Tahiti to collect plants of the breadfruit tree, with a view to acclimatizing the species to the West Indies. During their six-month stay on the island, his men became completely demoralized and mutinied on the return voyage. But a resentful crew, coupled with ravaging storms and ruthless savages, proved to be merely stages leading up to the anxiety-charged ordeal to come. Bligh, along with eighteen men, was cast adrift in an open boat only twenty-three feet long with a small stock of provisions-and without a chart. His narrative, deeply personal yet objective, documents the voyage and Bligh's relationship to his men, thereby exposing the oft debated question of what kind of man he really was.… (more)
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  1. The Bounty: The True Story of the Mutiny on the Bounty by Caroline Alexander(jseger9000)
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A Voyage to the South Sea,
Undertaken by command of His Majesty,
For the purpose of Conveying the Bread-fruit tree to the West Indies,
In His Majesty’s ship The Bounty,
Commanded by Lieutenant William Bligh,
Including an Account of the Mutiny on board of the said ship,
And the Subsequent Voyage of Part of the Crew, in the Ship’s Boat,
From Tofoa, one of the Friendly Islands,
To Timor, a Dutch Settlement in the East Indies.
The whole illustrated with charts, etc.
Published by Permission of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty
London: Printed for George Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, MDCCXCII.
264 pp. Advertisement. Frontispiece and 7 plates. PDF copy from Internet Archive.
It’s a shame this priceless historical document is usually published under titles like The Mutiny on the Bounty.* Sure, this is the mutiny: there has never been a more famous one. And yes, it is written by the notorious Captain Bligh whose name has become a byword for sea monster in human form. But the mutiny per se takes exactly one chapter (XIII) of exactly eleven pages. The first twelve chapters cover the ten-month journey to Tahiti (I–V), then called Otaheite, the five months the crew spent there trying to achieve the object of their mission (VI–XI), which was to take as many breadfruit trees as possible for cultivation in the Caribbean (then called West Indies), and the beginning of the back journey (XII). The last seven chapters cover Bligh’s 6,500-km voyage in an open boat with a group of loyal supporters to the Dutch colonies in modern Indonesia (XIV–XVII) – an astonishing feat of seamanship far more remarkable than the mutiny – and the uneventful return to England (XVIII–XX).
Bligh is dry. He is a humourless, repetitious and pedantic writer, chock-full of dates, latitudes, longitudes and nautical details that must be of interest only to historians. But he does mention a few striking incidents quite accessible to the general reader, and all the more telling because of his matter-of-fact style. This, for example, must have been an Olympian feat of gymnastics; but Bligh is not impressed:
In the afternoon, one of the seamen, in furling the main-top-gallant-sail, fell off the yard, and was so fortunate as to save himself by catching hold of the main-top-mast-stay in his fall.
The first part, while the longest and least interesting, contains some memorable moments. The Bounty visited Tenerife, Cape Town and Tasmania (Van Diemen’s Land in those days). Bligh is not the most avid sightseer, but he is an amateur astronomer, botanist, ornithologist and marine biologist of considerable expertise. He and the crew supplied their meagre diet aboard with anything they could kill on land, sea and air (dolphins, sharks, porpoises, birds). The most interesting place he visited was a workhouse (“Hospicio they call it”) on Tenerife founded and supervised by the governor. Bligh was impressed with this “humane institution” where many men and women were “rendered useful and industrious, in a country where the poor, from the indulgence of the climate, are too apt to prefer a life of inactivity, though attended with wretchedness, to obtaining comforts of life by industry and labour.”
The hardships of the journey are vividly conveyed. Even in the late eighteenth century, the Golden Age of Sail, sailing was a hazardous business. Heavy rain made the interior of the ship damp, fetid and thoroughly unwholesome. It must have been a job airing through the hatches, drying with fire and cleaning with vinegar. The storms of the South Atlantic made the decks “so leaky” that Bligh was obliged to leave the “great cabin [...] to those people who had wet births, to hang their hammocks in; and by this means the between decks was less crowded.” Contrary winds could slow down the ship’s progress to two and a half degrees (some 280 km) in twelve days! Bligh spent a month “drifting before the wind” around Cape Horn before he turned east to the Cape of Good Hope (for which he had prudently obtained the Admiralty’s permission before leaving England). Trust the ocean to teach you humility! Or as Byron put it in a favourite stanza of mine (Childe Harold, IV.179):
Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll!
Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain;
Man marks the earth with ruin – his control
Stops with the shore; – upon the watery plain
The wrecks are all thy deed, nor doth remain
A shadow of man’s ravage, save his own,
When, for a moment, like a drop of rain,
He sinks into thy depths with bubbling groan –
Without a grave – unknelled, uncoffined, and unknown.

The Tahitian chapters show off Bligh’s diplomatic skills. He wines and dines with the local chiefs, gives and receives presents, indulges them in every possible way. They want to see his cabin, he shows them around. They want to see a canon fired, no problem. They want King George to send them a ship full of English women, for sure something could be arranged. And so on, and so forth. Apparently a man of enormous energy, Bligh combines this busy social life with a good deal of real business. He is an amateur anthropologist, making copious notes on Tahitian history, customs, religion and anything else. He does some gardening, introducing exotic stuff like melon, salad and cucumber into the local flora, not to mention roses and other flowers. He does some animal husbandry, too. He loads his ship with more than one thousand breadfruit trees. He even shows some sense of humour at the expense of the gluttony, indolence and credulity of the natives, but he does so in a remarkably gentle and kind, curiously devoid of superiority, way. He learned something from Captain Cook on whose third voyage (1776–80) he was a sailing master.
On the whole, Bligh doesn’t come off as a particularly harsh captain in this first part. Rather to the contrary, he sounds like a man deeply concerned about the welfare of his crew. He is rightly proud that his men were in robust health during the voyage. Only one seaman died, of “an asthmatic complaint” or an infection after he was bled remains unclear. (The ship surgeon, having long suffered from “intemperance and indolence”, died on Tahiti.) Bligh must have been perfectly aware that his “able seamen”, as the official term goes, were also able lovers and more than a little attracted to the Tahitian damsels, but he never mentions this fact. Nor does he make any references to the harrowing future. Fletcher Christian is mentioned several times, but only in disappointingly peaceful contexts. Only in the last paragraph of Chapter XII does Bligh let the mutinous cat out of the bag:
Thus far, the voyage had advanced in a course of uninterrupted prosperity, and had been attended with many circumstances equally pleasing and satisfactory. A very different scene was now to be experienced. A conspiracy had been formed, which was to render all our past labour productive only of extreme misery and distress. The means had been concerted and prepared with so much secrecy and circumspection, that no one circumstance appeared to occasion the smallest suspicion of the impending calamity.
You would be searching in vain for Bligh’s legendary despotism and cruelty. Corporal punishment is hardly ever mentioned. One seaman got “two dozen lashes, for indolence and mutinous behaviour”, another got “a dozen lashes” because his negligence cost the rudder of the cutter (stolen by the ever-pilfering natives), a third got “nineteen lashes for striking an Indian”. All this sounds mild by the standards of time and place. The British Navy in the eighteenth century must have been teeming with greater sadists than William Bligh.
Of course the Captain could easily present himself in a better light than a more dispassionate account would have. To expect him not to do that is to expect perhaps a trifle too much from human nature. It is hard to tell. Judging by the court testimony of some of the mutineers and Bligh’s post-Bounty career, the Captain may have exaggerated his virtues just a bit. It is strange, to say the least, that he never mentions anything about the punishment of three seamen who made a lame attempt to desert the ship in Tahiti. They must have been punished, and harshly too. Then again, the familiar picture from too many books and movies, with Bligh as a cruel tyrant and Christian as an idealistic rebel, may well be even further from the truth.
Whatever the reasons, Bligh’s alleged inhumanity or the sex appeal of the Tahitian wahine, on 28 April, 1789, some distance west of Tahiti, the mutiny took place. Bligh describes how he was dragged from his bed just before sunrise and set adrift with most mutiny-breakers not much later as he might describe a tea party in his garden. But in the next three or four pages he allows himself more reflection and more emotion than in the previous 160.
He marvels at the brilliant organisation: “The secrecy of this mutiny is beyond all conception.” He asserts, truthfully or not, that he never noticed anything that might suggest “such a close-planned act of villainy”. Neither did 13 of his fellows in the boat who “always lived forward among the seamen”. Worse still, Fletcher Christian, Master’s Mate, and Peter Haywood, midshipman, not only came from respectable families in the north of England, as the bemused Captain notes, but both were also “objects of my particular regard and attention, and I had taken great pains to instruct them, having entertained hopes that as professional men they would have become a credit to their country”. In a famous passage, Bligh even grants Christian some “signs of remorse”:
Notwithstanding the roughness with which I was treated the remembrance of past kindnesses produced some signs of remorse in Christian. When they were forcing me out of the ship I asked him if this treatment was a proper return for the many instances he had received of my friendship? he appeared disturbed at my question and answered with much emotion: “That, – captain Bligh, – that is the thing; – I am in hell – I am in hell.”
It is not true to say, as some reviewers have, that Bligh professed himself ignorant of the reasons for the mutiny. Of course he never takes any blame. He seems so obviously blameless to himself that he never makes even the faintest allusion to this possibility. But he does give “the allurements of dissipation” as possible, even plausible, reasons. He may have a point there. He even makes a little joke in the end, assuring his readers that – to paraphrase Hercule Poirot about murders – if anybody wants to lead a mutiny, nothing can stop him from doing so sooner or later:
It will very naturally be asked, what could be the reason for such a revolt? in answer to which I can only conjecture, that the mutineers had flattered themselves with the hopes of a more happy life among the Otaheiteans, than they could possibly enjoy in England; and this, joined to some female connections, most probably occasioned the whole transaction.
The women at Otaheite are handsome, mild and cheerful in their manners and conversation, possessed of great sensibility, and have sufficient delicacy to make them admired and beloved. The chiefs were so much attached to our people, that they rather encouraged their stay among them than otherwise, and even made them promises of large possessions. Under these, and many other attendant circumstances, equally desirable, it is now perhaps not so much to be wondered at, though scarcely possible to have been foreseen, that a set of sailors, most of them void of connections, should be led away; especially when, in addition to such powerful inducements, they imagined it in their power to fix themselves in the midst of plenty, on one of the finest islands in the world, where they need not labour, and where the allurements of dissipation are beyond anything that can be conceived. The utmost, however, that any commander could have supposed to have happened is, that some of the people would have been tempted to desert. But if it should be asserted, that a commander is to guard against an act of mutiny and piracy in his own ship more than by the common rules of service, it is as much as to say that he must sleep locked up, and when awake, be girded with pistols.

Bligh’s voyage from the island of Tofua, in the Tonga archipelago, to Coupang, in the Dutch East Indies, forms the climax, if not the coda, of his narrative. The Captain and 17 loyalists survived for 48 days and almost 6,500 kilometres (3,500 nautical miles) in a boat merely seven metres (23 feet) long. The mutineers had given them 20 gallons of water, 150 lbs of bread, 32 lbs of pork, 6 quarts of rum, 6 bottles of wine, a quadrant, a compass, four cutlasses and the carpenter’s chest, but no charts or maps. The journey was an incredible achievement from a nautical point of view. Bligh may or may not have been a deck despot, but he certainly was a master navigator. An able seaman indeed!
It was an incredible tale of survival, too. Only one man was lost. He was killed by the natives of Tofua in a largely unsuccessful (indeed, counterproductive) attempt to get some provisions (they lost more than they gained: they left Tofua with “twenty-eight gallons of water, twenty pounds of pork, three bottles of wine, and five quarts of rum”). The rest survived on meagre rations occasionally augmented by raw meat from caught birds, with a good deal of starvation, thirst and wet weather thrown in for good measure. A landfall on May 29, on an island off the north-east coast of Australia (then New Holland), led to a real feast with oysters, fresh water, fire and “a stew that might have been relished by people of far more delicate appetites, and of which each person received a full pint.” Not everybody made it back home, though. Altogether five men died from tropical diseases and exhaustion in Coupang, Batavia or the sea en route Cape Town.
Bligh and a dozen men reached England in March 1790, only about two years and three months after they left it. The Captain doesn’t tell us how the bigwigs in the Admiralty reacted to his story, but I suspect their jaws dropped on the floor. Deserters from the British Navy were common in the South Seas, as Bligh himself confides, but they were usually caught and brought back with some help from the natives. But seizing His Majesty’s Ship and setting the captain adrift – that was another matter. That was something unprecedented.
Important historical document though it is, Bligh’s narrative makes for a rather tedious read. The first, pre-mutinous part, which takes more than 150 pages, is quite a slog. The last hundred pages are much more engrossing, but even they suffer from an obvious and almost painful lack of storytelling ability. What a page-turner full of suspense and drama a great writer would make of this material! Bligh had a great story to tell and no idea whatsoever how to tell it. And, of course, his story is incomplete. By necessity it doesn’t include the punitive expedition of the HMS Pandora and the fate of the mutineers on Pitcairn Island.
But if you have any interest in the Bounty legend, you have to read Bligh’s account, partial as it is in every sense of the word. Brace yourself for an overdose of dullness and read.
___________________________________________
*To be precise, some editions (e.g. Penguin Classics) reprint Bligh’s much shorter account, first published in 1790 and rightly titled A Narrative of the Mutiny on Board His Majesty’s Ship Bounty, etc.. Two years later, this work, revised and expanded, became Chapters XIII to XX of the much longer A Voyage to the South Sea, etc.. The longer account is much to be preferred. The first twelve chapters hardly ever mention the future mutiny, but they are revealing about Bligh’s personality. As he explains himself in the 1792 Advertisement, the “Narrative” was “drawn up in a hasty manner” and “required many corrections”, but it was printed quickly to satisfy the demand for “information concerning an event which had attracted the public notice”. The “Voyage” was Bligh’s definitive version and, in addition to the first twelve chapters, included an expanded account of the journey from Coupang to Europe. ( )
2Waldstein Sep 13, 2018
It never ceases to amaze me just how interesting the same events described over and over in the driest possible historical professional tone can actually be, when the stakes are high enough. The chapters of this describing the post-mutiny trip of nineteen people in a ship's boat over 3,000 miles, mostly on open sea, is fascinating. The pre-mutiny chapters on the islands are interesting, in the way historical accounts of interactions with natives are always interesting, if a little offputting at times. The very earliest and very latest chapters are basically a chronicle of a naval officer doing his duty in poorly-charted waters and are very, very boring.
(Obviously this is by the man's own hand, so Bligh comes off reasonably well in this book - or rather, he doesn't come off badly. He professes not the slightest understanding of why anyone would mutiny against him, which I think I believe. It does eventually become apparent that in the entire journey from the Bounty to Timor, he never ones mentions something that any of the other eighteen people in that boat actually did on their own initiative, and I find that both unlikely and somewhat telling of the narrator.) ( )
jen.e.moore Aug 5, 2015
A great collection of original documents about the Mutiny on the Bounty. Together they tell as good a sea yarn as any novel, complete with a Rashomon-like quality as two parties to the mutiny see everything in precisely opposite ways -- while agreeing on fragments of key details. There is some repetition, especially in some of the transcripts from the trial and testimonial letters on the character of Captain Bligh. This repetition, however, contributes to an almost biblical quality to the text as it lists names after names, retells the same story from different perspectives, and compiles narratives with more straightforward information.
Specifically, the items included in this volume are:
--Captain's Bligh's account of the mutiny and his 4,000 mile journey to safety in a long boat following it. Told in precise nautical terms -- dwelling less on the mutiny and more on how he survived following it and what he discovered in the process.
--A partial transcript of the court martial of the mutineers compiled with an appendix by Edward Christian, brother of the chief mutineer Fletcher Christian. This is intended to be largely exculpatory for his brother, arguing the Bligh was a borderline-psychotic taskmaster.
--A reply to the Appendix by Bligh and a short reply-to-the-reply by Christian.
--Captain's Bligh's orders and discoveries.
--An account of a mutineer captured on Tahiti and his transport back to England.
--Two news accounts of the discovery of the last surviving mutineer on Pitcairn Island in the Pacific.
--An account by 'Jenny,' who lived on Pitcairn Island. ( )
1jasonlf Sep 21, 2010
This book I read as a choice for 8th grade English class and found it to be very enjoyable. The details are amazing. I felt like I was in the tropics on the run from a crazy captain. It was the largest book I had read at the time. Well until I read Gone with the Wind. Amanda Fall 2010
1educ318 Aug 30, 2010
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Mutiny on the Bounty [adapted - Oxford Bookworms] by Tim Vicary

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The Mutiny on Board the HMS Bounty by Deborah Kestel
The Mutiny on Board the H.M.S. Bounty [Macdonald Illustrated Classics] (Retold by Kenton K. Smith) by Kenton K. Smith
The Mutiny on Board the HMS Bounty [adapted - graphic novel - Pocket Classics] by William Bligh

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The Mutiny on Board HMS Bounty [adapted - Great Illustrated Classics] by Deborah Kestel
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The King having been graciously pleased to comply with a request from the merchants and planters interested in his Majesty's West India possessions, that the bread-fruit tree might be introduced into those islands, a vessel, proper for the undertaking, was bought, and taken into dock at Deptford, to be provided with the necessary fixtures and preparations for executing the object of the voyage.
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Thus, of nineteen who were forced by the mutineers into the launch, it has pleased God that twelve should surmount the difficulties and dangers of the voyage, and live to revisit their native country.
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In 1787, William Bligh, commander of the Bounty, sailed under Captain Cook on a voyage to Tahiti to collect plants of the breadfruit tree, with a view to acclimatizing the species to the West Indies. During their six-month stay on the island, his men became completely demoralized and mutinied on the return voyage. But a resentful crew, coupled with ravaging storms and ruthless savages, proved to be merely stages leading up to the anxiety-charged ordeal to come. Bligh, along with eighteen men, was cast adrift in an open boat only twenty-three feet long with a small stock of provisions-and without a chart. His narrative, deeply personal yet objective, documents the voyage and Bligh's relationship to his men, thereby exposing the oft debated question of what kind of man he really was.

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The mutiny on board h.m.s. bounty pdf free download windows 10

Mutiny On The Bounty William Bligh

22278 Cover Mutiny
6/22/05
7:18 PM
Page 1
Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics
Sail the seas in good weather and bad on the ship H.M.S. Bounty. Flounder in a hurricane as you try to round Cape Horn. Sail to the South Seas the long way, around the Cape of Good Hope and through the Indian Ocean. Enjoy the idyllic island life and decide for yourself if the men on the Bounty should have mutinied against Captain Bligh. Find out what happened when the Captain and his men were put off the Bounty in a small rowboat with little food or water. Did they make it?
Saddleback eBook
Three Watson Irvine, CA 92618-2767 Website: www.sdlback.com
Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™
Three Watson Irvine, CA 92618-2767 Website: www.sdlback.com Copyright © 2006 by Saddleback Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the publisher.
ISBN 1-56254-926-X
Welcome to Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ We are proud to welcome you to Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™. Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ was designed specifically for the classroom to introduce readers to many of the great classics in literature. Each text, written and adapted by teachers and researchers, has been edited using the Dale-Chall vocabulary system. In addition, much time and effort has been spent to ensure that these high-interest stories retain all of the excitement, intrigue, and adventure of the original books. With these graphically Illustrated Classics™, you learn what happens in the story in a number of different ways. One way is by reading the words a character says. Another way is by looking at the drawings of the character. The artist can tell you what kind of person a character is and what he or she is thinking or feeling. This series will help you to develop confidence and a sense of accomplishment as you finish each novel. The stories in Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ are fun to read. And remember, fun motivates!
Overview Everyone deserves to read the best literature our language has to offer. Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ was designed to acquaint readers with the most famous stories from the world’s greatest authors, while teaching essential skills. You will learn how to: • Establish a purpose for reading • Use prior knowledge • Evaluate your reading • Listen to the language as it is written • Extend literary and language appreciation through discussion and writing activities Reading is one of the most important skills you will ever learn. It provides the key to all kinds of information. By reading the Illustrated Classics™, you will develop confidence and the self-satisfaction that comes from accomplishment— a solid foundation for any reader.
Step-By-Step The following is a simple guide to using and enjoying each of your Illustrated Classics™. To maximize your use of the learning activities provided, we suggest that you follow these steps: 1. Listen! We suggest that you listen to the read-along. (At this time, please ignore the beeps.) You will enjoy this wonderfully dramatized presentation. 2. Pre-reading Activities. After listening to the audio presentation, the pre-reading activities in the Activity Book prepare you for reading the story by setting the scene, introducing more difficult vocabulary words, and providing some short exercises. 3. Reading Activities. Now turn to the “While you are reading” portion of the Activity Book, which directs you to make a list of story-related facts. Read-along while listening to the audio presentation. (This time pay attention to the beeps, as they indicate when each page should be turned.) 4. Post-reading Activities. You have successfully read the story and listened to the audio presentation. Now answer the multiple-choice questions and other activities in the Activity Book.
Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™
Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™
Step-By-Step The following is a simple guide to using and enjoying each of your Illustrated Classics™. To maximize your use of the learning activities provided, we suggest that you follow these steps: 1. Listen! We suggest that you listen to the read-along. (At this time, please ignore the beeps.) You will enjoy this wonderfully dramatized presentation. 2. Pre-reading Activities. After listening to the audio presentation, the pre-reading activities in the Activity Book prepare you for reading the story by setting the scene, introducing more difficult vocabulary words, and providing some short exercises. 3. Reading Activities. Now turn to the “While you are reading” portion of the Activity Book, which directs you to make a list of story-related facts. Read-along while listening to the audio presentation. (This time pay attention to the beeps, as they indicate when each page should be turned.) 4. Post-reading Activities. You have successfully read the story and listened to the audio presentation. Now answer the multiple-choice questions and other activities in the Activity Book.
Overview Everyone deserves to read the best literature our language has to offer. Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ was designed to acquaint readers with the most famous stories from the world’s greatest authors, while teaching essential skills. You will learn how to: • Establish a purpose for reading • Use prior knowledge • Evaluate your reading • Listen to the language as it is written • Extend literary and language appreciation through discussion and writing activities Reading is one of the most important skills you will ever learn. It provides the key to all kinds of information. By reading the Illustrated Classics™, you will develop confidence and the self-satisfaction that comes from accomplishment— a solid foundation for any reader.
Welcome to Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ We are proud to welcome you to Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™. Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ was designed specifically for the classroom to introduce readers to many of the great classics in literature. Each text, written and adapted by teachers and researchers, has been edited using the Dale-Chall vocabulary system. In addition, much time and effort has been spent to ensure that these high-interest stories retain all of the excitement, intrigue, and adventure of the original books. With these graphically Illustrated Classics™, you learn what happens in the story in a number of different ways. One way is by reading the words a character says. Another way is by looking at the drawings of the character. The artist can tell you what kind of person a character is and what he or she is thinking or feeling. This series will help you to develop confidence and a sense of accomplishment as you finish each novel. The stories in Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™ are fun to read. And remember, fun motivates!
Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics™
Three Watson Irvine, CA 92618-2767 Website: www.sdlback.com Copyright © 2006 by Saddleback Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the publisher.
ISBN 1-56254-926-X
22278 Cover Mutiny
6/22/05
7:18 PM
Page 1
Sail the seas in good weather and bad on the ship H.M.S. Bounty. Flounder in a hurricane as you try to round Cape Horn. Sail to the South Seas the long way, around the Cape of Good Hope and through the Indian Ocean. Enjoy the idyllic island life and decide for yourself if the men on the Bounty should have mutinied against Captain Bligh. Find out what happened when the Captain and his men were put off the Bounty in a small rowboat with little food or water. Did they make it?
Saddleback eBook
Three Watson Irvine, CA 92618-2767 Website: www.sdlback.com

Hms Bounty Mutiny

The mutiny on board h.m.s. bounty pdf free. download fullThe Mutiny On Board H.M.S. Bounty PDF Free Download

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Buy a cheap copy of The Mutiny On Board H.M.S. Free shipping over $10. The court-martial of Byam and his companions begins. Testimony is given by the men of the Bounty who made it back to England. Byam and the other men are then allowed to present their defenses. The judges deliberate and find Byam, along with five of the other nine men, guilty of mutiny against the Bounty.

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