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FM 10-17 ( Quartermaster Organization and Service in Army a.pdf download 2.8M FM 10-22 ( Quartermaster Clothing and General Supplies Depo.pdf download. Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit NAP.edu/10766 to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. The Quartermaster candidate may still be granted a bridge of review. The failure of a Skipper or ship committee to sign an application may be considered by the bridge of review in determining the qualification of the Quartermaster candidate. When the completed application is received at the council service center, its contents will be. Armed Forces Recipe Service. UNITED STATES ARMY. UNITED STATES NAVY. NAVSUP Publication 7. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. AFJMAN 34-606 Volume I and Volume II.

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The Quartermaster Book

APPENDICES
Suggested Citation:'APPENDIX I: Dedication of the Wilkins Arctic Test Chamber.' National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
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Suggested Citation:'APPENDIX I: Dedication of the Wilkins Arctic Test Chamber.' National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
The Quartermaster PDF Free download

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix IDEDICATION OF THE WILKINS ARCTIC TEST CHAMBERMAJOR GENERAL ANDREW T. MCNAMARAThe Quartermaster GeneralDepartment of the ArmyWashington, D. C.We in the Army Quartermaster Corps find it appropriate to dedicatethe Arctic Environmental Test Chamber here at our Research andEngineering Center to the memory of our respected colleague andfriend, George Hubert Wilkins.May I say also, Lady Wilkins, that we are truly honored and deeplygrateful that you have come to join us today in this tribute to yourfamous husband.Before Sir Hubert joined us in 1942, he already had a most im-pressive record of accomplishments. While many of us who were hisfriends know something of what he had done in the fields of adventure,exploration, and military service, I think it is fitting on this occasionto recall some of those achievements.In the Balkan War of 1912-13 Wilkins became the first photographerto obtain motion pictures of actual combat. He was also one of the firstto parachute from an aircraft—no mean feat, considering the aircraftand parachutes of that day!The outbreak of World War I found him second-in-command to Dr.Stefansson—also here with us today to honor Sir Hubert's memory—on an expedition in the Arctic, a place then so remote that not untilSeptember 1915 did Sir Hubert learn that a war had engulfed theworld.Eager to get to the battle fronts, he left the expedition in 1916,returned to Australia, and was commissioned in the Australian FlyingCorps. After journeying more than 30,000 miles from the Arctic toAustralia and then to Europe, he finally reached the Western Front.He took part in every engagement fought by the Australians. He waswounded nine times. He was twice mentioned in dispatches. And hewas awarded the Military Cross with Bar for Exceptional Bravery,which is the British equivalent to our Distinguished Service Cross,second only to our Medal of Honor.Following World War I, Sir Hubert began a series of polar flightsthat won him international acclaim. His great flight with Eielsonfrom Pt. Barrow, Alaska, across the Arctic Ocean to Spitzbergen in1928 has been compared to Lindbergh's similar feat of that day incrossing the Atlantic. It was following this flight that he was knightedby King George V, not just for his polar exporations, as was popularlyassumed, but also for his wartime record and his contributions to thesciences.141

After accompanying Sir Ernest Shackleton on his last voyage, theone on which that great explorer died, Sir Hubert's next expeditionwas to the other end of the earth and resulted in the first aircraftflights in the Antarctic in November 1928.In 1931 Sir Hubert came back to his first love, the Arctic. Usingthe obsolete U. S. Navy Submarine 0-12, which he renamed the'Nautilus', he began a research project in which he made the firstunderwater cruises beneath the Arctic icepack. The final chapter ofthis adventure was completed in 1958 when two of the Navy's newatomic submarines successfully traversed the entire polar icepackunderwater. In honor of Sir Hubert's earlier achievements, the Navynamed one of the subs the 'Nautilus'.In 1936 Sir Hubert returned to the Antarctic, where he helpedorganize the first aircraft crossing of that remote continent. Thecrossing was made by the American explorer Lincoln Ellsworth andPilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon.By 1937 the golden age of polar exploration was drawing to a close,but again Sir Hubert was a participant. His aerial searches in theArctic for the downed Russian flyer Levanevsky covered some 150,000square miles of the Arctic basin never before seen by human eyes.With the advent of World War II, Sir Hubert placed his vast know-ledge and experience at the disposal of the United States ArmyQuartermaster Corps to assist in developing cold-weather clothingand equipment for our own troops and those of our Allies.Few if any Quartermaster developments can be credited to the workof a single individual, for they all represent team effort by the timethe item is issued to troops. Nevertheless, there is scarcely an exampleof cold-weather clothing or equipment in the U. S. Army supplysystem today which does not carry the imprint of Sir Hubert'scontributions.General Georges F. Doriot, who was Chief of The QuartermasterGeneral's Military Planning Division during World War II, has said:'One outstanding attribute of Sir Hubert was his willingness toundertake any task, notwithstanding how dangerous or difficult it was,and to always carry it out successfully with great modesty on hispart.'He was a man of boundless energy and was never perturbed by hissurroundings. He was never demanding and was always ingenious infinding a solution to a problem. If he was unable to induce a tailor tomake a design exactly as he conceived it, he would sit down at thesewing machine and make the item himself. He was indefatigable andalways wanted to test items himself. He would continue long afteryounger men became exhausted.Even in later years he never spared himself in whatever he under-took. He insisted upon going on field maneuvers so that he couldpersonally evaluate developmental items under the most difficultconditions. He was adamant in insisting upon realistic field testing.142

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